Anthony Scaramucci & Trump

Jul. 22nd, 2017 01:15 pm
angerona: (Default)
[personal profile] angerona
В Wired интересная статья с подборкой высказываний Anthony Scaramucci -- нового директора коммуникаций в Белом Доме.  Его твитты показывают, что почти по всем вопросам у него расходятся мнения с Трампом -- или расходились по крайней мере еще год назад.  

Вместо того, чтоб ободриться от этого, -- что вот же, человек со своим мнением, и его наняли -- у меня один вывод: на самом деле у этого Скарамуччи, видимо, единственное убеждение: быть поближе к власти и власть-имущим.  А принципы, моральные качества, мнения-шмения -- это все дело сотое.

Мне совершенно не жаль Спайсера, кстати.  Да, у него была жалкая позиция, и его все время подставлял его босс -- и да, над ним смеялись и продолжают смеяться.  Но у него была возможность уйти в любой момент.   Это, кстати, хороший урок на будущее тем, кто оказался в незавидной рабочей ситуации.   Уйди он это после разглашения имейлов Дональда Трампа Джр. -- скажи, что уходит из принципов, то его зауважали бы, наверное -- или относились совершенно по другому бы.  Он же хлопнул дверью только тогда, когда ему назначили нового босса, вместо того, чтоб дать эту позицию ему.  Ну и фиг с ним.  


Three sentences about 2017-07-21

Jul. 21st, 2017 09:59 pm
irilyth: (Default)
[personal profile] irilyth
Better progress on the daunting project! Matt and I finally sat down and really wrote down all the stuff that needs to happen, and in what order, and started to scheme about who's going to do it, and I now feel like I have a much clearer sense of what specific critical parts I need to get done no seriously really soon now, and what complicated and possibly vague and TBD parts can wait until after that (by which point they'll be much less vague and the Ds will have B). Just in time for the weekend, and then a week on call, of course, but still. Enough is written down that I think I can do it.

I'd stopped at Home Depot on the way to work to pick up a plumber's snake, and then used it to unclog the shower drain, which it did nicely, pulling up a ball of hair approximately the size and shape and general appearance of a standard-issue mouse rodent. (It was in fact hair, though, and not a mouse rodent that had somehow crawled into the shower drain, which ew.) Played a good game of Robot Turtles with Q, did Junie's bedtime, and now it's my bedtime.
sovay: (Claude Rains)
[personal profile] sovay
A Facebook friend asked: "For my film-loving friends: what are films you hope to see in the Criterion Collection someday? Not just films you love, but films that fit the aesthetic and would make sense as Criterion films." So I posted the following textbrick in reply and figured I might as well reproduce it here, now with (occasionally really old) links:

The complete Derek Jarman, Super 8 shorts and music videos included. Herzog's Fitzcarraldo (1982), because it has always confused me that you can get the documentary from Criterion but not the film itself. Anything by Ulrike Ottinger, but especially Johanna d'Arc of Mongolia (1989) and Taiga (1992), which one could and should pair. Some kind of box set of Dennis Potter, making sure not to leave out the long-banned original TV version of Brimstone and Treacle (1976). Wayne Wang and Paul Auster's Smoke (1995). Some reasonable amount of Peter Greenaway, but The Pillow Book (1996) and Prospero's Books (1991) in their proper aspect ratio should head the list. Fred Zinnemann's Act of Violence (1948), a knockout noir about memory and atrocity with far less of a reputation than it deserves. Max Ophüls' The Reckless Moment (1949), one of the most devastating—and feminist—noirs I've ever seen. John Ford's The Long Voyage Home (1940), Eugene O'Neill's favorite film realization of any of his plays. Ben Wheatley's A Field in England (2013). And while I'm dreaming of ponies, The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T (1953).

—There are other movies I'd like to see from Criterion, of course. Robin Hardy's The Wicker Man (1973), especially considering the plethora of versions that have existed over the years (and may still be buried under the M4). I don't know if they'd go for Roy Ward Baker's The October Man (1947) unless it was part of a set of British noir, but seriously, how bad would that be? If they can announce an upcoming release of Agnieszka Smoczyńska's The Lure (2015)—the day after my birthday, I appreciate it—surely they could provide me with a nice edition of Marcin Wrona's Demon (2015). I'm sort of confused they've never done anything by Dorothy Arzner. I'm really confused they haven't already done the Wachowskis' Bound (1996). And so on. Some of it is the definitive home release idea, but a lot of these movies I would just like to be able to show people more easily than 35 mm or unpredictable flybys on TCM.

Dreams 07/21/2017

Jul. 21st, 2017 07:07 am
kalibex: (Default)
[personal profile] kalibex
Guit/Stress dreams.  Dreamed I was in a house, and I let my cat go too close to an open (no screen) window while were on the 2nd floor, and I was sitting with my feet on the windowsill...and he lost his balance slipped, and fell out.  I didn't freak (for a wonder), but got up and carefully, deliberately looked out and down.  I caught a glimpse of him down there, and got that he was still alive.

Went down and out to find him, and found him being attacked (in a slow way) by another cat. Chased the other cat off him and was preparing to pick him up and take him inside. Said to myself in a self-congratulatory way,"This is why we get them their rabies shots!!"

Jupiter Ascending (2015)

Jul. 20th, 2017 11:37 pm
hermionesviolin: (that which IT has not [fox1013])
[personal profile] hermionesviolin
Jupiter Ascending was everything the Internet promised me it would be AND! BONUS! the villain is capitalism.

so on my way home I was saying Fully Automated Luxury Gay Space Communism )

Three sentences about 2017-07-20

Jul. 20th, 2017 11:08 pm
irilyth: (Default)
[personal profile] irilyth
More halting progress on the big daunting project, but I haven't fully destroyed its dauntingness yet. Maybe tomorrow, or maybe being on call next week will set me back to square one again, we'll see. :^p Made Thai yellow curry chicken and peas and carrots for dinner, forgot to buy the garlic naan, made rice instead. The shower drain is clogged, and plunging and coathangering didn't help (and might even have hurt, oddly), boiling water may have helped a little but hasn't fully cleared it out. Will plunge some more, and maybe either call a plumber or go buy an actual plumber's snake, tomorrow.
siderea: (Default)
[personal profile] siderea
Can somebody update me on the present legal status in the US of graphical user interfaces as intellectual property? Am I correct in believing they can't be patented (though the code can be copyrighted)?

What I really want to know: Can I rip off GVoice's old/retired web interface legally? Or more accurately, can I pay somebody else to do it for me with reasonable ability to assure them they won't go to jail or get sued into oblivion for doing it?

To be clear, there are some nifty functional subtleties I'd want to make off with, which I wouldn't even want to bother pretending I came up with on my own. For instance, there's some interesting algorithm for how texts are batched into threads which I haven't entirely reversed engineered, but make a huge difference in readability.

Three sentences about 2017-07-20

Jul. 20th, 2017 12:41 pm
irilyth: (Default)
[personal profile] irilyth
Got some stuff done at work, still finding the big-daunting-project aspect to be intimidating, but continuing to throw myself at it, and eventually I'll get on top of it. Played a couple of games with Q before bed, Go Fish and Memory Game, the latter of which he's quite good at, although it's generally close (and last night I think we tied twice in a row). Fell asleep on Junie's floor doing her bedtime, went to bed early myself.
sovay: (Lord Peter Wimsey: passion)
[personal profile] sovay
My poems "A Death of Hippolytos" and "The Other Lives," published last October in The Cascadia Subduction Zone 6.4, are now free to read online with the rest of their issue. The first was inspired by Jules Dassin's Phaedra (1962) and especially by this afterthought, the second was written for Rose Lemberg after discussing Ursula K. Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness (1969). [personal profile] gwynnega has poetry in the same issue.

I had heard absolutely nothing of Guillermo del Toro's The Shape of Water (2017) until this afternoon, but the trailer makes it look like something I should very definitely see in December. It looks like William Alland and Jack Arnold's Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) retold through Jane Yolen's "The Lady and the Merman," which has haunted me since elementary school when I first read Neptune Rising: Songs and Tales of the Undersea Folk (1982). It looks sea-deep.

Speaking of oceanic things for which I may existentially blame Caitlín R. Kiernan: Delphine Cencig, "Poulpe Fiction."

In fact, I have another doctor's appointment tomorrow.
sovay: (PJ Harvey: crow)
[personal profile] sovay
Second doctor's appointment in as many days, coming up. First, links.

1. [personal profile] spatch sent me this handy-dandy list: "Times Doctor Who Was Ruined Forever." The site is snarky and some of their tags are jerkass, but the article itself is gold. "21/03/1981 – The best Doctor ever is replaced by a vet. Doctor Who dies."

2. Following my belated discovery of Jack Buchanan, I am pleased to see that the HFA will be showing Ernst Lubitsch's Monte Carlo (1930) on Friday. I wonder if I have ever actually seen Jeanette MacDonald.

3. I had no idea one of the performers of "The Grass Is Always Greener" was Lauren Bacall (and I think I had forgotten the song came from a musical by Kander and Ebb, although listening to its brassy swing, I don't know who else it could have been). Standing Room Only on WERS used to play it all the time. I like how her voice softens on the repeated line That's wonderful, but her unimpressed What's so wonderful? could pass for Elaine Stritch. This makes me desperately sad that Bacall never recorded "The Ladies Who Lunch."

4. This is a gorgeous photoset, but I would love to see the on-set photos from the shoot. Like, the backstage stuff. People just standing around on snack breaks, being Klimt paintings.

5. This was true last weekend as well, but I was at Readercon and couldn't do anything about it: [personal profile] spatch swapped in for one of the hosts of the PMRP's Murders and Scandals: Poe and Doyle at the last minute, so I'll see him this weekend on one of the nights I'm not seeing Jack Buchanan.

Dreams 07/19/2017

Jul. 19th, 2017 07:13 am
kalibex: (Default)
[personal profile] kalibex
Random collection of travel dreamage.  Considered going somewhere by bus or train, but didn't go in the end, I guess. Also, hung around a fairground area; was going to go see a specific exhibit, but waited too long (saw one guy and his friends apparently sneak in but not really as it turned out).  People were breaking down that area.  Might have been 'balloons' (shades of missing the balloons being up at a balloon festival a couple of weeks back).
spatch: [Don Music] (Don Music)
[personal profile] spatch
"Well, you walk around on two legs, that's wonderful."
"What's so wonderful? Your spine is made of rubber, that's wonderful."
"What's so wonderful? First you lick your own butt..."

"OH, THE DIVIDENDS ARE SWEETER FROM SOMEBODY ELSE'S TECH STOCKS--
OH, THE SAND IS ALWAYS NEATER IN SOMEBODY ELSE'S LITTER BOX"


exeunt, pursued by kander and ebb
sovay: (Lord Peter Wimsey)
[personal profile] sovay
Van Heflin's first starring role and the feature debut of director Fred Zinnemann, MGM's Kid Glove Killer is not a lost classic of crime cinema, but it is a fun little procedural of a B-picture with some sharp dialogue and more forensic detail than I've seen in this era until John Sturges' Mystery Street (1950); its technical tickyboxes include ballistic fingerprinting, fiber analysis, spectrography, endlessly labeled slides, and the first-rate chemistry in-joke of mocking up a reaction with dry ice so that the flask looks like it's got something really fancy going on inside it. The film's heroes are a pair of underpaid scientists working for the crime lab of the Chicago-ish city of Chatsburg, which has lately suffered the shocking double loss of both its crusading DA and its sincerely incorruptible mayor, neither of natural causes unless ropes, ponds, and car bombs can be filed under acts of God; despite the necessarily painstaking nature of their work, Heflin's Gordon McKay and Marsha Hunt's Jane Mitchell find themselves expected to deliver miracles on command, conjuring a killer's name out of the stray threads and burnt matches and dog hairs that might as well be so many oracle bones as far as the impatient police, press, and public are concerned. No one outright suggests railroading the small business owner seen loitering around the mayor's house the night before the explosion—furious that the new DA's vaunted crackdown on crime didn't extend to the hoods shaking him and his wife down for protection—but there's a lot of official pressure to connect the dots to Eddie Quillan's hot-headed innocent. In the meantime a sort of love triangle is progressing between the two scientists and one ambitious lawyer, although the viewer can't invest too much in the romantic suspense since our privileged information includes the identity of the murderer. I confess I'm not sure where the kid gloves came into it.

It is rare for me not to like Heflin in a film, even when he's playing kind of a dick, and he makes an engaging proto-nerd here, a slouchy, grouchy smart-ass in a lab coat who has managed to figure out that he's in love with his educated, attractive coworker but not yet that flirting by insult only works for Oscar Levant. (His eventual apology is legitimately adorable.) Hunt as Mitchell is nicely, unequivocally competent and has little time for her colleague's negging even as it's clear from space that she'd reciprocate his interest if he were only a little less schoolyard about it, but her character feels like a conservative compromise when she insists repeatedly—despite sufficient aptitude for chemistry that she has a master's degree in it—that forensics is "no career for a woman." I do appreciate that heteronormativity is defused at least once by McKay conceding wryly that it's "not much of a career for a man, either. No prestige, no glamour, no money. People holler at you when there are no miracles." I suppose it is also sociologically interesting that the script's anxiety about science and gender runs both ways—unless it's to prove that spending nine-tenths of your life behind a microscope doesn't make you less of a man, I have no idea why McKay is apparently incapable of confronting a suspect without a fight scene. He is otherwise not very macho, which I am fine with. He can't throw a dart straight to save his life. If the human heart were located in the right elbow, though, that firing-range target would have totally had it.

The extremely spoilery original trailer suggests that Kid Glove Killer was intended as the start of a series and I'm almost surprised it didn't happen—if Thin Man stand-ins Joel and Garda Sloane could get a trilogy, I don't see why we couldn't have enjoyed more McKay and Mitchell. As it is, the one film is all we've got. It runs 72 minutes and they are worth it all for the scene in which Heflin performs a precise, self-annotated mime of catching, cleaning, preparing, and then jettisoning a trout, all with the serious concentration of the slightly sloshed. He handles plain air so confidently, you can see the glint of the butter knife he's cleaning on the tablecloth and want to hand him one of those modern-day rubber grips for the ketchup bottle with the sticky cap. I have no idea if it was part of the original script or improvised on set or what on earth, but now I want to know where I can find more Van Heflin doing mime. He and Zinnemann would later reteam to superb and less comic effect in Act of Violence (1948). I appear to have seen Hunt as the Broadway-bent eldest of Frank Borzage's Seven Sweethearts (1942), but I don't hold it against her. Ava Gardner cameos as a cute married carhop. I hope to God mineral oil salad dressing is as much a thing of the past as the constant chain-smoking in chemically sensitive laboratory conditions. [edit: WHAT THE HELL IT'S NOT.] This investigation brought to you by my scientific backers at Patreon.

sequels to Hugo nominees

Jul. 18th, 2017 11:37 pm
psocoptera: ink drawing of celtic knot (Default)
[personal profile] psocoptera
Paper Girls 2, comic. The main new conceit of this volume (as set up at the end of volume 1) is a hugely compelling premise for me. I kind of wish they'd been able to hit it harder/dig in deeper... I mean, the emotional tone was in keeping with the rest of the comic, but. Dude. Way to concretize what happens to be one of my core emotional conflicts. Maybe there'll be fic? Maybe I'll write some?

Raven Stratagem, Yoon Ha Lee. My reaction is under the cut, as is a GIANT MASSIVE PLOT SPOILER. Sufficient warning? MAJOR SPOILERS HERE? Read more... )

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